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This has an application, and it ties in to that ray tracing… - Blather, Rinse, Repeat
July 19th, 2007
06:54 pm

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This has an application, and it ties in to that ray tracing nonsense, and it ties into an after-hours programming project, but the basic idea is - what's the deal with boring old RGB values?

I wanted to get 20 discrete colors as separated as possible in colorspace, and this is what I came up with.

A less useful display of the same colors is here:



That looks an awful lot like the old Apple ][ low res graphics palette. But I'm a little concerned that the greens all look so similar. I know that human perception's a crazy thing, and RGB space isn't as useful as, say, YUV space for representing perceptual color. So, maybe I'll take another run at this in a bit.

But hey, I've just printed this out, and I'm going to cut it out and fold it to look at in more detail.




ETA: Ok, duh. I folded together the paper model of the picture above, and it's clear to me now one of the problems. I was worried that the greens were so similar, and it looked like the pinks were, too - there's a good reason, and I should have been able to see it in the unfolded image, above.

What I was trying to accomplish was spread the colors out as evenly as possible, but if you look at the two magenta-pink-ish dots in the center, they're practically on top of eachother, while the yellow dot is much further away from the white dot.

Ok, back to the drawing board.




ETA2:

You math geeks out there may be ahead of me on this one, but I just did some poking around and stumbled on this page:

http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Dodecahedron.html

And, in particular, there's a cube inscribed in a dodecahedron, which might be very close to what I need - it's a simple pattern, and I can do the mathematically simple projection, or I can tweak a single number (as opposed to three, which I had been attempting).

Also, all 8 of the vertices of the RGB cube coincide with vertices of the dodecahedron, which means the popular colors all show up for free.

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