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Hm. I went to Kinko's to get the mosaic printed out. At 21x14… - Blather, Rinse, Repeat
December 7th, 2004
07:57 pm

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Hm.

I went to Kinko's to get the mosaic printed out. At 21x14 inches, it cost me just shy of $20. That seems a shade expensive.

Speaking of shades, the image which printed out on my home printer tolerably well is awfully, awfully dark when printed out at Kinko's. I'm saddened by that. I know that screens and print are different beasts, but perhaps my printer has some special settings that I don't know about.

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[User Picture]
From:dixiecheese
Date:December 7th, 2004 08:56 pm (UTC)
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okay...color me clueless, but what does your icon say?
[User Picture]
From:tsmaster
Date:December 8th, 2004 09:56 am (UTC)
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Ah yes, that icon denotes geekiness beyond normal bounds.

Hold on, it's a scary ride.

Programmers often find it useful to use base 16 to represnt numbers. This means that each digit ranges from 0 to 15 (instead of 0 to 9 for base 10, you know). So that means we've got to find extra characters for the extra 6 digits. Let's use A-F, so that means that A=10, B=11, and F=15.

Remember how your base 16 math works? The last digit is used as is, the second to last digit is multiplied by 16, the third by 16*16=256, and so on.

So, knowing all this, a hexidecimal 44 would mean 4*16+4, which is... hands, please? Right, 68.

And 4C? Let's not see the same people raising their hands. 4*16+12 = 76.

What about the 0X? That's shorthand for hexadecimal. That's how you know that we're talking base 16 and not 10 or, heck, octal or even base 27.

As to why I broke it up into two pairs of two digits each, eh, that'll be clear later. You'd think that I'd break it up like 0x44 4C, but maybe your state doesn't allow spaces.

So. We've got two numbers teased out of our criptic string, 68 and 76. Again in a feat of geeky esoterica, I introduce the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII). That's the way that text is encoded on just about all computers these days. But you knew that. There's a handy ASCII table here.

And, what do you know. 68='D' and 76='L'.

Monogrammed license plate, dipped in nerdliness, with an extra layer of geek.

I warned you.
[User Picture]
From:dixiecheese
Date:December 8th, 2004 04:18 pm (UTC)
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Umm...yeah. You lost me at "Programmers."

;-)
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From:tsmaster
Date:December 8th, 2004 05:20 pm (UTC)
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:)

The picture ON the plate? Mount Rainier, my favorite mountain.
[User Picture]
From:dixiecheese
Date:December 8th, 2004 05:28 pm (UTC)
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Hmm. Haven't thought to claim a Favorite Mountain before. I kinda like Pike's Peak. Also, our local Stone Mountain is kinda nice. Oh, and Lookout Mountain in Chattanooga is kinda cool, too. And then there was the one we always drove *though* when we were kids on the way out to our family in Pennsylvania. Something about a highway built smack through the middle of a mountain always thrilled the little Fox kids.

Maybe someday I'll see yours. :)
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From:tsmaster
Date:December 8th, 2004 06:03 pm (UTC)
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I think it was in the book "Measure of a Mountain" that I stumbled across this description:

If you get a placemat at a diner that has a map of the US with little pictures on the states, the three pictures of the state of Washington will be apples, salmon and Mount Rainier.


In a weird way, Seattle's like Springfield from The Simpsons. Springfield has Mount Springfield rising up in the background. Occasionally people will go from the city to the mountain, but mostly it's a landmark. It's technically part of the Cascade Mountain Range, but since it stands so far apart from other mountains it's easy to identify and locate. I've lived here most of my life, and I have a hard time identifying individual mountains out of the Cascades, or the other range in the area, the Olympic Mountain Range.

When a Washingtonian refers to "The Mountain", it's pretty clear which one they mean.

As a kid, I did a fair bit of hiking around Mount Rainier. It was far away to be a destination, close enough to be a day trip. That combination allowed me to pick a favorite mountain at a young age.

These days, the notion of a favorite mountain seems goofier than it did then. The iconic stature of the mountain has served to draw in more and more people, so it's more crowded than I like these days.

But it's still a plenty good destination for some casual hiking.



[User Picture]
From:dixiecheese
Date:December 8th, 2004 06:07 pm (UTC)
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So, a question then. Do you miss the East Coast at all? I know you've experienced both. Which do you like better and why?

Seriously, I'm curious, because up until this year my Mom, East coast born and raised (Bethlehem, PA...spent the weekends on the Jersey Shore), had never travelled West but now says she would probably move there if she had the chance (we're talking San Fran or north, not that L.A. kind of thing). I'm just curious to know from someone who has made both coasts "home" -- what's really the difference?
[User Picture]
From:tsmaster
Date:December 8th, 2004 06:52 pm (UTC)
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> Do you miss the East Coast at all?

Oh, absolutely.

There are a lot of things about New England that I miss, far and away first amongst which would be my friends. Even though many of my friends have moved away, my nostalgia for the time with them is the first thing I think of when you ask this question.

Now and then, I miss bits of living in Cambridge - walking to the local mall, walking to the local artsy movie theatre, public transportation, the vibrancy of a college town, the quaint flinty New England character.

But then the question has to be asked: would I move back to New England? Massachusetts? Cambridge?

And from a very deep place in me, a place where words don't really reach, I know that I wouldn't. I'd love to visit the East Coast a couple times a year. But HOME is out here. The mountains, trees, ferns, clouds, moss and mud are my personal woolen blanket that lets me know that I'm in the right place.

> someone who has made both coasts "home"

Ha. :) New England wasn't ever really "home", even after I had lived there for 9 years. There was a point when I knew I was going to quit my job in the city, and I was about ready to move from Cambridge to some less expensive suburb. I suddenly realized that I had been saying "one day I'll move back to the Northwest", and there was nothing keeping me from making a big move instead of a small one.


So. I can easily answer which I like better, but I have a hard time giving reasons. I suppose I could come up with a list of justifications - I rarely have to shovel snow where I live now, for instance.
[User Picture]
From:tsmaster
Date:December 8th, 2004 06:07 pm (UTC)
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> our local Stone Mountain is kinda nice

I really ought to come visit you one day - let's swap trips to see eachother's local mountains. :)
[User Picture]
From:dixiecheese
Date:December 8th, 2004 06:08 pm (UTC)
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Okay! Mind you, MY moutains are probably pebbles compared to yours...but they're still sweet, charming and beautiful in their own way. :) Ask Shell.
[User Picture]
From:tsmaster
Date:December 8th, 2004 06:53 pm (UTC)
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:) I'll try to leave my mountain snobbery at home.
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