Dave LeCompte (really) (tsmaster) wrote,
Dave LeCompte (really)
tsmaster

Ah, digital photography.

The sculpture has turned a corner in a calculus humor sort of way - I've passed the center of the sphere and from here on to the top is only going to get faster and faster as the radius of each successive slice is less.

For the most part, the sculpture will be more and more self-supporting for a while, and then I suppose it might start having problems right at the top. I'll be sure to complain about that when it happens.

Some regrets that I'll admit to about this sculpture: I positioned the colors in my plans based on a more or less random approach, and so I've got a lot of the same color contiguous, which I probably wouldn't do again.

Also, I think that the next time I do a sphere of any sort, I'll bite the bullet and start at the bottom, even though it's a pain to cantilever out each new layer. Right now I'm afraid of what will happen when I go to take the sculpture as built off that grey plate and add in the bottom quarter of the sphere.

Even still, I'm gratified by some of the pleasing shapes that I'm seeing in this thing - in the back right of the sculpture (relative to the camera... being symmetric, the sculpture has no back or right), you can see 4 black knobby bits and one yellow bit surrounding a hole (kinda tricky to make out where the hole is, perhaps). This pattern is going to repeat over and over again. In fact the leftmost two of those black knobby bits form another pentagon of knobs with a yellow and a blue knob (and one that hasn't been built, as it'd be underneath the grey plate just now). And at the center of that pentagonal constellation, there's another hole which might be just a little easier to make out.

And in case you're wondering about the little straws that seem to be perched on and around the sculpture, they're much like those poles at ski areas that tell the plows where to find the road. Except plows create negative space (a trench) where these things are guides for my creation of positive space. Really, they just serve to keep my graph paper lined up, which you probably guessed by the regular grid of 1x1s on the grey plate already.


I recently heard somebody make the claim: "When a man does it, it's art, when a woman does it, it's craft". I think that's bunk, but I'm not exactly sure in my mind where I draw the line between art and craft. If it's got no purpose other than to look pretty, I might call it art. If it's functional, and still pretty, it might be crafts. My sphere thing? I'm not sure that it's pretty, and it certainly isn't functional. Call it a mathematical exercise, perhaps.


I don't get enough exercise.
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Comments allowed for friends only

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 0 comments